Ayodele Samuel Adebayo
Unclebigbay's πŸš€ Blog

Unclebigbay's πŸš€ Blog

4 Methods of Javascript window.location you should know

4 Methods of Javascript window.location you should know

Ayodele Samuel Adebayo
Β·Jul 23, 2021Β·

4 min read

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Hello beautiful people πŸ€—, how are you doing today?

In this article you will learn about the 4 methods of window.location in JavaScript with their use cases, but before we do that, let's take a brief look at the definition of the window.location itself.

DEFINITION

The window.location is one of the useful BOM (Browser Object Model) APIs, which is available in JavaScript for interacting with the browser.

Like the name implies window dot location, it gives us access to the current page address (URL) which is the current location of the browser window and also allows us to navigate to another webpage within our script, isn't that wow-some 😍?

PREREQUISITES

Before you continue with this article, I assume that you have the following at your fingertips in order to have a smooth ride together.

  1. A Basic understanding of JavaScript
  2. A computer with a browser
  3. Your Code Editor and
  4. This article πŸ€—

Without any further ado, let's check out the 4 methods of window.location available on the browser below.

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  1. The assign() method

  2. The reload() method

  3. The replace() method

  4. The toString() method


1. The assign() method

Sometimes we want to redirect the user to another webpage or to another website entirely from our JavaScript code or function.

Let's say for example we have two buttons which 1 redirects to the Google home page and the other redirect to Hashnode homepage.

image.png

We can achieve this by using the assign() method in JavaScript like below.

HTML


<button onclick="redirectToGoogle()" class="google">Google Homepage</button>
<button onclick="redirectToHashnode()" class="hashnode">
    Hashnode Homepage
</button>

CSS

button {
    background-color: dodgerblue;
    border: none;
    color: white;
    padding: 12px 32px;
    font-size: 19px;
    margin: 5rem 1rem;
    cursor: pointer;
}

.hashnode {
    background-color: purple;
}

JavaScript

function redirectToGoogle() {
    window.location.assign("https://www.google.com");
}
function redirectToHashnode() {
    window.location.assign("https://www.hashnode.com");
}

Live Example

Explanation

What is happening under the hood is that the assign() method takes the passed URL and replaces it with the current URL, causing the browser to load the specified URL (just like hitting the enter key).

you can check out my article on protecting web pages using the assign() method for redirecting unauthorized users back to the homepage.

2. The reload() method

The reload() method is the native command for F5 on the keyboard which refreshes the webpage on the browser.

Let's build our own refresh button below πŸ’ƒ

HTML

<button onclick="reloadCurrentPage()">Reload (F5)</button>

CSS

button {
    background-color: red;
    border: none;
    color: white;
    font-size: 17px;
    padding: 12px 32px;
    font-weight: 700;
    cursor: pointer;
}

JavaScript

function reloadCurrentPage() {
    window.location.reload();
}

Live Preview

Codepen does not allow refreshing. you should test it out yourself.

3. The replace() method

Similar to the assign() method, the replace() method also replaces the current URL with the resource (page) from the specified URL.

But why do we have the replace method when the assign() method also replaces the current URL? πŸ€·β€β™€οΈ Check out the difference between the two methods from the article below πŸ‘‡

4. The toString() method

This method comes in handy when you need to retrieve the current URL from a browser or to get the value of an anchor href HTML tag.

The syntax for using toString() method is string = object.toString();

where:

  1. string is the returned value. It is called a USVString which is different from the JavaScript string type.

  2. object is either window.location.string or the anchor tag.


Let's code


1. Getting the URL of the current page

console.log(window.location.toString());

Output

We have access to the current URL on the address bar and is printed to the console.

image.png


2. Getting the URL from an anchor tag href

Say we have an anchor tag that redirects to the Hashnode landing page.

Let's retrieve the URL it contains

HTML

<a href="https://www.hashnode.com" class="hashnode-url">Hashnode Homepage</a>

JS

const getUrl = document.querySelector(".hashnode-url");
console.log(getUrl.toString());

Output

image.png


Wow, what a journey, I am glad you made it to the end of this article, if you enjoyed and learned something new from this article, I will like to connect with you.

Let's connect on

My friend and I are holding a meetup every Saturday to discuss JavaScript and other programming tips and to support ourselves.

You can be a part πŸ‘‡ of the community by joining our WhatsApp group



See you in the next article. Bye Bye πŸ™‹β€β™‚οΈ

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